zohbugg:

dr-ift:

bl-ossomed:

niick4:

this is the coolest thing ive seen on this website

holy

Wait what how

what the fuck you mean how? a goddamn computer, that’s how
fuckin think this is some real bullshit like you’re confused as to how someone can hold water and a tiny ass ship are u fuckin’ kidding me
"how"
fuck u

zohbugg:

dr-ift:

bl-ossomed:

niick4:

this is the coolest thing ive seen on this website

holy

Wait what how

what the fuck you mean how? a goddamn computer, that’s how

fuckin think this is some real bullshit like you’re confused as to how someone can hold water and a tiny ass ship are u fuckin’ kidding me

"how"

fuck u

(Source: dimensao7, via gnumblr)

(via gnumblr)

design-is-fine:

Yusaku Kamekura, poster artwork for Electoral Management, 1968. Japan. Via GuraFiku

design-is-fine:

Yusaku Kamekura, poster artwork for Electoral Management, 1968. Japan. Via GuraFiku

manbartlett:

justinpetropoulos:

theparisreview:

“I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer.”
RIP Gabriel García Márquez

com os anjos!

xo

manbartlett:

justinpetropoulos:

theparisreview:

“I see dreams as part of life in general, but reality is much richer.”

RIP Gabriel García Márquez

com os anjos!

xo

gnumblr:

I want a love like this someday

gnumblr:

I want a love like this someday

(Source: highnotesthekid)

bpod-mrc:

13 April 2014
Cascade of Colour
The development of melanocytes – the cells that give colour to our skin – is a complicated process. Their growth is controlled by a network of many different genes that can switch on and off at different times, as well as triggering others within the network in a cascade of gene activity. By discovering and mapping out the relationships between these genes, scientists hope to reveal how faults in the system can lead to diseases such as melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer. Here they’re studying melanocyte development in zebrafish embryos, using colourful dyes to stain particular active genes in cells. Taking ‘snapshots’ at different times of development can gradually build up a picture of the genes responsible for a melanocyte: from stem cell to fully-functioning mature cell.
Written by Manisha Lalloo
—
Image courtesy of Alberto LapedrizaPart of the University of Bath’s Images of Research Competition 2013 Copyright University of Bath 
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

13 April 2014

Cascade of Colour

The development of melanocytes – the cells that give colour to our skin – is a complicated process. Their growth is controlled by a network of many different genes that can switch on and off at different times, as well as triggering others within the network in a cascade of gene activity. By discovering and mapping out the relationships between these genes, scientists hope to reveal how faults in the system can lead to diseases such as melanoma, an aggressive form of skin cancer. Here they’re studying melanocyte development in zebrafish embryos, using colourful dyes to stain particular active genes in cells. Taking ‘snapshots’ at different times of development can gradually build up a picture of the genes responsible for a melanocyte: from stem cell to fully-functioning mature cell.

Written by Manisha Lalloo

Image courtesy of Alberto Lapedriza
Part of the University of Bath’s Images of Research Competition 2013
Copyright University of Bath

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

coolsciencegifs:

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Newton’s third law says that forces come in equal and opposite pairs. This means that when air exerts lift on an airplane, the airplane also exerts a downward force on the air. This is clear in the image above, which shows a an A380 prototype launched through a wall of smoke. When the model passes, air is pushed downward. The finite size of the wings also generates dramatic wingtip vortices. The high pressure air on the underside of the wings tries to slip around the wingtip to the upper surface, where the local pressure is low. This generates the spiraling vortices, which can be a significant hazard to other nearby aircraft. They are also detrimental to the airplane’s lift because they reduce the downwash of air. Most commercial aircraft today mitigate these effects using winglets which weaken the vortices’ effects. (Image credit: Nat. Geo./BBC2)

So unbelievably awesome.

coolsciencegifs:

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Newton’s third law says that forces come in equal and opposite pairs. This means that when air exerts lift on an airplane, the airplane also exerts a downward force on the air. This is clear in the image above, which shows a an A380 prototype launched through a wall of smoke. When the model passes, air is pushed downward. The finite size of the wings also generates dramatic wingtip vortices. The high pressure air on the underside of the wings tries to slip around the wingtip to the upper surface, where the local pressure is low. This generates the spiraling vortices, which can be a significant hazard to other nearby aircraft. They are also detrimental to the airplane’s lift because they reduce the downwash of air. Most commercial aircraft today mitigate these effects using winglets which weaken the vortices’ effects. (Image credit: Nat. Geo./BBC2)

So unbelievably awesome.

4nimalparty:

by George Kogias
starwars:

Spotlight Of The Week - Alderaan

starwars:

Spotlight Of The Week - Alderaan

design-is-fine:

E. L. Trouvelot, Total eclipse of the sun, Observed 1878, at Creston, Wyoming. Chromolithograph. From the Trouvelot Atlas of astronomical drawings. NYPL

design-is-fine:

E. L. Trouvelot, Total eclipse of the sun, Observed 1878, at Creston, Wyoming. Chromolithograph. From the Trouvelot Atlas of astronomical drawings. NYPL