earthandanimals:

This Cyclops Shark was found 3 years ago off the Coast of Mexico
While the shark is somewhat reminiscent of Blinky, the three-eyed fish from The Simpsons, it is the result of the prosencephalon (forebrain) failing to separate into two hemispheres during embryonic development. As the brain failed to separate, only one optic lobe formed, leading to only one eye. This condition often results in miscarriage, and those that survive  to birth typically die within a day. As the shark would have needed to defend itself from the moment it was born, it would not have lasted very long.
"This is extremely rare, as far as I know less than 50 examples of an abnormality like this have been recorded,” Felipe Galván-Magaña of the Mexican Institute of Sciences.
Full article here

earthandanimals:

This Cyclops Shark was found 3 years ago off the Coast of Mexico

While the shark is somewhat reminiscent of Blinky, the three-eyed fish from The Simpsons, it is the result of the prosencephalon (forebrain) failing to separate into two hemispheres during embryonic development. As the brain failed to separate, only one optic lobe formed, leading to only one eye. This condition often results in miscarriage, and those that survive  to birth typically die within a day. As the shark would have needed to defend itself from the moment it was born, it would not have lasted very long.

"This is extremely rare, as far as I know less than 50 examples of an abnormality like this have been recorded,” Felipe Galván-Magaña of the Mexican Institute of Sciences.

Full article here

(via tiny-creatures)

emda-randolph:

I parsed the text of 6 Shakespearean tragedies and marked the location of questions across the length of the the entire play. Each work shows a distinct visual signature.

emda-randolph:

I parsed the text of 6 Shakespearean tragedies and marked the location of questions across the length of the the entire play. Each work shows a distinct visual signature.

cvinceillustration:

***GIVEAWAY!***

Ola everybody!
With the NUA End of Year Show finished, my degree over and my graduation all done, I can finally give away what’s left of the postcards from my exhibition!

I have SIX PACKS OF FIVE POSTCARDS to giveaway, here’s the details of how to enter:

The first six people to message me on this Tumblr blog with the name of their favourite animal and reblog this post will be the winners of a pack of five postcards each.

All I ask is for £1 via PayPal to cover the cost of postage if you have a UK address and £2/$3.40 for anywhere else. I’ll then ask you for your address so I can send over the winnings!

This isalso a massive thank you to all my new followers I seem to have obtained over the last couple of weeks. You guys rock.

Good luck everybody!

Capybara

(via scientificillustration)

bpod-mrc:

19 July 2014
Slipping its Tethers
An estimated 34 million people worldwide currently live with AIDS, a disease of the immune system caused by the virus HIV. Infecting the white blood cells that normally defend us against disease, such as lymphocytes and macrophages, this virus also neutralises the body’s antiviral weapons at the molecular level. One such weapon is tetherin, a protein that binds to virus particles and tacks them to the cell membrane, preventing their release into the bloodstream. Pictured are macrophages (nuclei stained blue) in which the immune response has been activated. Tetherin (in green) is seen alongside a protein (in red) that’s highlighting the membrane compartments where HIV particles are assembled before release. But HIV evades tetherin’s grasp with a weapon of its own – a protein called Vpu – which stimulates degradation of tetherin. This adaptation may have been a key step in the successful spread of HIV-like viruses in primates to human hosts.
Written by Emmanuelle Briolat
—
Image by Mark Marsh and Sebastian GieseUniversity College LondonOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in PLOS Pathogens, July 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

19 July 2014

Slipping its Tethers

An estimated 34 million people worldwide currently live with AIDS, a disease of the immune system caused by the virus HIV. Infecting the white blood cells that normally defend us against disease, such as lymphocytes and macrophages, this virus also neutralises the body’s antiviral weapons at the molecular level. One such weapon is tetherin, a protein that binds to virus particles and tacks them to the cell membrane, preventing their release into the bloodstream. Pictured are macrophages (nuclei stained blue) in which the immune response has been activated. Tetherin (in green) is seen alongside a protein (in red) that’s highlighting the membrane compartments where HIV particles are assembled before release. But HIV evades tetherin’s grasp with a weapon of its own – a protein called Vpu – which stimulates degradation of tetherin. This adaptation may have been a key step in the successful spread of HIV-like viruses in primates to human hosts.

Written by Emmanuelle Briolat

Image by Mark Marsh and Sebastian Giese
University College London
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in PLOS Pathogens, July 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

Akira (1988): Cityscapes

(Source: kajis-watermelons, via gnumblr)

llbwwb:

little red flying foxes by rick angel

llbwwb:

little red flying foxes by rick angel

(via tiny-creatures)

tiny-creatures:

Creobroter meleagris Stål, 1877 by jcorreasg on Flickr.
realgrumpycat:

Grumpy Cat’s first @QVC appearance is tonight at 8PM Eastern / 5PM Pacific #GrumpyCatQVC

realgrumpycat:

Grumpy Cat’s first @QVC appearance is tonight at 8PM Eastern / 5PM Pacific #GrumpyCatQVC

sfmoma:

SubmissionFriday:
Alexander Zavyalovhttp://sashapok.tumblr.com/http://www.flickr.com/photos/sahaz/