"I was going to buy the iPhone 6 Plus, but I already have a flat-screen TV."

— Conan (via teamcoco)

gnumblr:

🙏

gnumblr:

🙏

nemfrog:

Spectra of various sources of light. Astronomy for the Use of Schools and Academies. 1882.

nemfrog:

Spectra of various sources of light. Astronomy for the Use of Schools and Academies. 1882.

(via scientificillustration)

fer1972:

Black and White Photography by Rebecca Jane Johnston 

bpod-mrc:

18 September 2014
Smiley Giant
This happy face belongs to a giant cell, formed when several immune cells (known as macrophages) team up and fuse together. Although they may look like eyes and a mouth, the dark spots are actually the cells’ nuclei – the ‘control centres’ containing their DNA. These unusual cells are created in certain illnesses where the immune system runs out of control and causes inflammation such as arthritis, which affects the joints, or the kidney disease glomerulonephritis. A molecule on the surface of macrophages, called KCNN4, directs this biological get-together in mice and humans by orchestrating a complex interacting network of cellular signals. KCNN4 has previously been implicated in other types of over-enthusiastic immune response, and drugs that block it are already being tested in clinical trials for immune system-related conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. So maybe they could be useful for treating other illnesses too.
Written by Kat Arney
—
Image by Enrico PetrettoMRC Clinical Sciences Centre Copyright held by original authorsResearch published in Cell Reports, August 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

18 September 2014

Smiley Giant

This happy face belongs to a giant cell, formed when several immune cells (known as macrophages) team up and fuse together. Although they may look like eyes and a mouth, the dark spots are actually the cells’ nuclei – the ‘control centres’ containing their DNA. These unusual cells are created in certain illnesses where the immune system runs out of control and causes inflammation such as arthritis, which affects the joints, or the kidney disease glomerulonephritis. A molecule on the surface of macrophages, called KCNN4, directs this biological get-together in mice and humans by orchestrating a complex interacting network of cellular signals. KCNN4 has previously been implicated in other types of over-enthusiastic immune response, and drugs that block it are already being tested in clinical trials for immune system-related conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease and asthma. So maybe they could be useful for treating other illnesses too.

Written by Kat Arney

Image by Enrico Petretto
MRC Clinical Sciences Centre
Copyright held by original authors
Research published in Cell Reports, August 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

guardian:

These dramatic photos come from California, where firefighters are currently battling an out-of-control wildfire in the Sierra Nevada mountains. By Wednesday, it had spread through 111 square miles and was threatening more than 2,000 homes.

Photographs: Noah Berger/Reuters

wrmoore:

Elephant Face
Illustration/ Graphite on Paper 

wrmoore:

Elephant Face

Illustration/ Graphite on Paper 

(via scientificillustration)

bpod-mrc:

08 September 2014
Reflections on Bone
It looks like a Day-Glo stone circle, but this picture actually shows bones of mice – ribs, tibia, femur, and scapula – that have been genetically modified to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). The lower half shows bones in which cartilage cells have been tweaked to glow green, while the upper part shows bones in which cartilage cells and bone-forming cells called osteoblasts derived from those cartilage cells are tagged green. It’s long been thought that cartilage cells die off, leaving a tissue scaffold that serves as a template on which osteoblasts lay down bone. But by using GFP to tag cartilage cells and track their offspring, researchers found that they can survive and become bone-forming cells during embryonic development or in adulthood, when bones are repaired. This discovery changes our understanding of the cast of cells that make bones, which has implications for how we view the causes of bone disorders.
Written by Daniel Cossins
—
Image by Kathryn Cheah and colleaguesThe University of Hong KongOriginally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)Research published in PNAS, August 2014
—
You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

bpod-mrc:

08 September 2014

Reflections on Bone

It looks like a Day-Glo stone circle, but this picture actually shows bones of mice – ribs, tibia, femur, and scapula – that have been genetically modified to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). The lower half shows bones in which cartilage cells have been tweaked to glow green, while the upper part shows bones in which cartilage cells and bone-forming cells called osteoblasts derived from those cartilage cells are tagged green. It’s long been thought that cartilage cells die off, leaving a tissue scaffold that serves as a template on which osteoblasts lay down bone. But by using GFP to tag cartilage cells and track their offspring, researchers found that they can survive and become bone-forming cells during embryonic development or in adulthood, when bones are repaired. This discovery changes our understanding of the cast of cells that make bones, which has implications for how we view the causes of bone disorders.

Written by Daniel Cossins

Image by Kathryn Cheah and colleagues
The University of Hong Kong
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Research published in PNAS, August 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

fer1972:

Only for Coffee Addicts: Fake Coffe Branding by Illarion Gordon